Women’s Autonomy and Child Health: A Focus on Health Status, Use of Malaria Prevention and Treatment Services

Authors

  • Nito Magesso Lurio University & Rovuma University
  • Boaventura Cau

Keywords:

Women autonomy, Children under 5 years old, health, Malaria

Abstract

This research analysed the potential role of women's level of autonomy in the health status and use of malaria prevention and treatment services for children under five in northern Mozambique. To achieve this goal, we use quantitative methodologies. The data are from IMASIDA (2015). Of that data, this study used two analytical subsamples: the first with 1972 children under the age of five of married or divorced mothers. This constitutes the subsample for the analysis of the children's health status. The second subsample consisted of 662 children who had become ill. This was the subsample for analysis of whether a certain mother sought advice or treatment for her child with fever. Descriptive statistics were used for analyses in this study. It was found that children of mothers with medium or high autonomy were less likely to get sick (30.4%), followed by children of mothers with low autonomy (31.3%), and finally children of mothers without autonomy (34.0%). The results also show that mothers with medium or high autonomy were more likely to take their sick children to seek advice or health care (69.7%), followed by mothers without autonomy (62.1%), and lastly, mothers with low autonomy (54.9%). Furthermore, differences were found between the dimensions of autonomy in their influence both on a child's risk of illness and on her mother's propensity to seek advice or treatment. According to the findings, children of mothers who make important household decisions alone are more likely to take their sick children to the doctor (69.0%), followed by children of mothers who make decisions alone about visiting family or other close relatives, and finally children of mothers who make decisions about their own health care (49.1%). In the northern region of Mozambique, it was discovered that factors like the mother's educational level, the socioeconomic standing of her household, and the location of her home—rural or urban—had an impact on both the likelihood that children would become ill as well as their mothers' propensity to seek medical advice or treatment.

Published

2023-08-07

How to Cite

Magesso, N. L., & Cau, B. M. (2023). Women’s Autonomy and Child Health: A Focus on Health Status, Use of Malaria Prevention and Treatment Services. GNOSI: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Human Theory and Praxis, 6(2), 7-29. Retrieved from http://gnosijournal.com/index.php/gnosi/article/view/219

Issue

Section

Articles